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Our Top 10 Tips for your Reflux Baby!

  1. If you are bottle feeding and you are using an Anti-Reflux formula, we recommend using a variable flow teat. This allows you to manage the feed more effectively. At the start of the feed when baby is hungry, use the medium flow side of the teat. As the feed progresses, baby can get tired as it is a thickened feed. You can change to the faster flow side of the teat if needed at
    this point but be careful that it is not too fast for baby.
  2. The manufacturers of all anti reflux formulas recommend that the bottle is shaken to mix the formula. In general, the instructions will be to roll the bottle upright between the palms of hands for 5 seconds as soon as the scoops of powder have been added. Then shake bottle for 20 seconds and leave it to stand for 7 minutes to allow it to thicken.
    Sounds straightforward doesn’t it. But the skill you want is making up the formula with as few air bubbles as possible.
    Many of the mums who come to see us have said that they prefer to stir the powder into the water. Why? Well, they feel that shaking the bottle can add air bubbles to it and as we know, that’s exactly what you don’t want. In a survey where we asked mums if they shake or stir, 63% of mums said they shake the bottle to mix it and 37% said they stirred it.
  3. In our opinion, all bottle feeding should be done in a paced way, allowing baby to control the feed, and preventing them from becoming overwhelmed by the flow of milk. This is particularly true for reflux babies. Lying a baby back in your arms and holding the bottle almost vertical over them can mean that they can become overwhelmed by the force of the milk coming into their mouth as gravity increases the flow. As a baby must breathe and swallow at the same time, having a fast milk flow will interfere with this process and baby will gag. They also take in too much air as the feed quickly to manage the increased flow.
    The best position for paced or controlled feeding is to hold baby in a semi-upright position, as opposed to lying down. This helps baby to control the flow of milk better. He only needs to be slightly reclined so that the bottle isn’t pouring down into baby’s mouth.
    Lay the bottle teat across baby’s lips (pointed up) when baby starts rooting and opening his mouth. Let baby pull the teat into his mouth and close his lips on the base of the teat.
    Once latched on, keep the bottle just above horizontal. This allows baby to control the flow of milk better without taking in air. This also helps the bottle to last the entire length of a normal feeding, usually 10–20 minutes, rather than baby gulping a bottle down in 5 minutes.
  4. When changing your baby, prop him up on a wedge or pillow so that his head is higher than his bum. To clean the bum, turn baby to the side rather than lifting his legs up. Change baby before a feed rather than after. You may need to change again after the feed but keeping baby in the propped-up position will help.
  5. Car seats can be troublesome for some reflux babies due to the position they find themselves in. You must buy the car seat before baby arrives so you can’t try it on, so to speak. Even though your baby will be in an elevated position in his car seat, being slumped will put pressure on his tummy and aggravate reflux. Some seats keep baby more upright than others and some babies are very slumped in their car seat.
    It depends on the depth of the seat and the age of the baby. New-born babies are often too small for their car seats. They’ll be in it until they are 18 months old after all! Most car seats come with little inserts for new-born babies to help them stay upright. If your baby still looks slumped in their car seat, placing a soft towel or blanket folded under their bum will reduce the depth of the cup and keep them more upright. If you are doing this, do ensure that the safety of the car seat isn’t compromised, and that baby is secure.
  6. Tummy time is very important but can pose a problem for reflux babies. Rather than lying baby on the floor for tummy time, consider lying them on a wedge or an exercise ball to keep them in an elevated position while on their tummy. Timing of tummy time is key too. Aim for when baby is happy and content and not within 90 minutes of the last feed.
  7. Soothers have positives and negatives when it comes to reflux babies. Some love the soother, other never take to it. Sucking a soother can help baby swallow back down any stomach contents that may reflux up. Sucking also stimulates the wave like movement of the gut, helping to move any wind along the digestive tract. Saliva produced in the mouth has a slight antacid effect and can help in a small way as it’s swallowed. And of course, the sucking action is instinctive in a baby and therefore has the added benefit of calming an upset baby.
    Worth noting though, if you are breastfeeding, it is often recommended that you do not offer your baby a soother for the first six weeks while feeding is becoming established. Talk to your Lactation Consultant about this if you have any concerns.
  8. Keep baby in an upright and straight position if possible, during feeds and for at least 30 minutes afterwards. This helps to keep food in the tummy by gravity. Reflux babies tend to like to over the shoulder position for this very reason, they are upright and straight. You can also lie baby on their tummy on your lap. Keep one knee higher than the other so that baby’s head is higher than the bottom.
  9. We often hear from parents that their baby loves being upright with their head on the parent’s shoulder. In this position the parent will be moving around, and baby is content. But try to sit down and you will be told very firmly that’s not allowed!
    A tip for this is to use a gym ball. Sit on the gym ball with baby held upright. You can gently bounce on the ball or move back and forth.
    This is also a very handy tip for when you are putting baby in their car seat. Reflux babies don’t like the car seat and can become quite distressed. Once baby is secured in the car seat, gently bounce the seat on the gym ball. It’s a game changer, I promise!
  10. Find the cause (or causes) of your baby’s reflux symptoms and treat that first. Just treating the reflux symptoms will have a very limited and short-lived effect. We have worked with babies and children for over 30 years and based on our experience, we have developed an online course for parents who are looking for the solution for their baby’s reflux. How do you know if this course is the right one for you? Well, ask yourself these questions.
    Has your baby been diagnosed with reflux?
    Is your baby still in discomfort and pain?
    Is treatment not making any difference to your baby?
    Is he screaming in pain?
    Do you have to hold your baby all the time?
    Do you feel helpless, not knowing what is wrong and how you can help?
    Then yes, our course is exactly what you are looking for.
    Want more information?

Slings and Carriers and why they may help a reflux baby!

Using a sling or a baby-carrier can take a lot of pressure off a parent of a reflux baby. Now, not every reflux baby will like a sling or carrier, but because of the upright position, some can find it very comfortable.

If you feel you are sitting under baby all day, or perhaps you have other children at home who are demanding your attention, maybe a sling could help. Babywearing is a great way to hold and comfort your baby while keeping your hands free to get stuff done. There are many different types available, some are nice and simple, others look a lot more complicated. We’ll run through a few of the types below for you. We would also suggest that you ask family and friends for a loan of a sling/carrier they may have used with their little one. Trying a few different styles will give you a better guide as to what’s most comfortable for you and baby. You can then purchase that one (unless the borrowed one is not needed back of course).

Carriers

A soft and structured baby carrier is probably the most popular. It has straps and buckles that attach around the parent’s waist and back to secure the baby in the carrier. They are very easy to wear and to put baby into. A few adjustments will secure your little one and you are off! The only con really is that some carriers do not have sufficient support for a new-born. So, if you are buying one, be sure to check the age of suitability.

Wraps

Wraps are exactly as you’d expect – a long piece of fabric you wrap around you and baby to hold baby. Stretchy fabric wraps are great for new parents. You can tie the wrap around you and then put baby in. Because they are stretchy, they may feel more secure when you are new to wraps. It can be a two-person job to start with, but you’d won’t be long getting proficient. As your baby gets older, a woven wrap may be better suited. You can carry baby on your chest or on your back, though you’ll probably need to look at a few YouTube tutorials to master the different techniques.

Ring Sling

If the idea of a wrap scares you, but you do want something that offers a bit more variety than a soft and structured carrier, then a ring sling may be worth considering. This is a long piece of fabric with rings sewn at one end. The other end is fed through the ring to secure it. There is still a little bit of technique with these, but they are easier than the wrap. They can be used from new-born to toddler.

Support for Babywearing

In Ireland: Babywearing Ireland

In UK: https://www.babywearing.co.uk

IMPORTANT

If you do choose to use a sling or a carrier it is very important to follow the manufacturers guidelines and TICKS Rule for Safe Babywearing devised by the UK Sling Manufacturers & Retailers Consortium.


Did you know we also have online courses for new parents? As a new parent it can sometimes feel overwhelming and we believe the more information you have, the sooner you can solve any issues your baby may have.

Your Newborn Baby is a course about the common issues we see in babies at our clinic. We look at delivery, flat head, torticollis, colic, reflux, allergy and so much more.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach is specifically for parents of reflux babies. It will help you identify and treat the cause of your baby’s reflux and explain how best to treat the reflux symptoms your baby may have.

For more information about our courses click the button below.


How to recognise tension in a newborn baby.

You wouldn’t expect a newborn baby to have muscular tension, would you?

But newborn babies can experience tension too and very often this can be because of labour or delivery. Musculoskeletal tension can also contribute to feeding difficulties when there is an associated cranial nerve dysfunction.

Let us explain. Three nerves travel through a small hole in the skull (the jugular foramen) at either side of the head. If a baby’s head is fixed in an asynclitic position, that is, where the head of the baby is presenting first and is tilted to the shoulder, then this results in the head no longer being in line with the birth canal. The can result in the compression of the 3 cranial nerves. These nerves are vital for the baby to feed effectively and when compromised, baby can have a poor suck-swallow-breathe mechanism. They can take in too much air as the feed, their latch can be poor and they can be quite unsettled.

So what can cause or contribute towards muscle tension in your baby?

*If you had a very fast delivery, or a very prolonged labour.
*If baby was in a slightly different position for delivery, for example, face to the stars.
*If you had twins and space was at a premium towards the end of pregnancy.
*If baby needed some assistance at delivery, a vacuum delivery for example.

These are all reasons why a baby may have muscular tension.
The good news is paediatric osteopathy can help release this muscular tension and return baby to the midline. This is where they are meant to be.



So, what does tension look like in a baby?


They can have a one-sided head preference, often as a result of a torticollis (tight neck muscles).
They can have a furrowed brow, or look cross.
Their fists can be clenched.
They can have a flat head. This too is often connected to a torticollis as baby tends to lie on the same part of their head.
They can be unsettled digestively.
They often don’t like to lie flat, preferring to be upright in your arms.
And the tend to not like their car seat.



If you would like to book an appointment to have your newborn baby assessed, call us on 021 4348918 or book online.


Did you know we also have online courses for new parents? As a new parent it can sometimes feel overwhelming and we believe the more information you have, the sooner you can solve any issues your baby may have.

Your Newborn Baby is a course about the common issues we see in babies at our clinic. We look at delivery, flat head, torticollis, colic, reflux, allergy and so much more.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach is specifically for parents of reflux babies. It will help you identify and treat the cause of your baby’s reflux and explain how best to treat the reflux symptoms your baby may have.

For more information about our courses click the button below.

Our Online Courses

We have recently published 2 online courses for parents of newborn babies. Our courses will give you the benefit of all our years of experience treating babies. We want to find a solution for every baby we see at our clinic and over the years we have studied the most common conditions we see in babies in detail, looking for causes, optimum treatment options, new research, and practical solutions. We have combined all this information in these courses so that we can help as many babies (and parents!) as possible.

During our time working with babies, we have seen many changes. Back when we started there really was no information available for parents other than from their Public Health Nurse or Doctor. The terms “all babies cry” and “he will grow out of it” are throwbacks from this era and demonstrate clearly how poorly babies and their parents were treated.

Of course, you may still be told this today but thankfully you have the power in your hands, and you can seek out a solution for your baby’s distress yourself. In fact, doing that has brought you to us and our online course.

Our online courses will show you how to understand and solve your baby’s upset. No big words or complicated theories we promise. Just no-nonsense professional advice and information from people who love babies.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach €99

Baby Reflux can feel like an extremely complicated condition with many causes, treatments, and solutions. We will break it down for you piece by piece so that you will see why your baby has reflux and how you can help your baby feel more comfortable and happier.

Reflux can also require many frequent adjustments. It can feel like 1 step forward, 2 steps back some days. Again, we will help you navigate these adjustments with clarity, understanding why they are necessary and how they will help. We believe information is essential for parents dealing with baby reflux. It shows you light at the end of the tunnel. It points you in the direction of that light. And it keeps you sane!

Sign Me Up


Your Newborn Baby – €39

Having a baby is life changing. There’s so much to learn and it can sometimes feel overwhelming, particularly if baby is a little unsettled. This online course guides you through the first few months, providing information about the early weeks, your postnatal plan, crying and sleeping, colic, reflux, milk allergy, tongue tie, flat head and more…..

Sign me up


Let us help you become the best possible advocate for your baby.

Unlimited access

  • Go at your own pace with this self-guided online courses
  • The course is available as soon as you sign up and it never expires.
  • You don’t need to watch it from start to finish in one go. We do however recommend that you watch all the sections to ensure you do not miss an essential part of the puzzle for your baby.
  • The course will be updated with new information as it emerges and will be ready and waiting for you if and when you need it again.

Easy to follow videos

Our course is a mix of clear and practical video presentations (generally between five and ten minutes long) and text downloads to support the information we give in the videos.

Helpful Downloads and Pintables

Our course includes downloadable information sheets.

Reliable and professional information

Frank is a Paediatric Osteopath registered with the Osteopathic Council of Ireland and the General Osteopathic Council in the UK. Rose is a general nurse and a midwife and is registered with the Nursing Board in Ireland.  Knowing that the information we give you is based on our experience treating reflux babies for many years and is backed up by our professional qualifications, gives you the peace of mind you need. After all, you only want the best for your baby.

How important is a Postnatal Care Plan?

As a new mum you have responsibility for the welfare of your new baby but who looks after you? You have made plans and talked about your pregnancy and the birth, but what about when you get home with baby?

Making a few preparations and having a few conversations before baby is born will mean you have arrangements in place when you will need a little help or assistance.

Looking after your health and wellbeing during pregnancy will mean you are better placed to cope with labour and delivery and the immediate postnatal period. Remember self-care is not “me first”, it’s “me too”. By looking after your own physical and mental wellbeing, you are ensuring you can give your best to your baby. As the saying goes, you cannot pour from an empty cup.

If you intend to make a postnatal care plan for your over-all post birth wellness, here are a few tips that may help.

  • What products will you need after baby is born? Have a good stock of everything you may need for you (and baby). Put your postnatal care kits in the bathrooms you use. Ask for recommendations from other mums for the products they felt worked best for them.
  • Make a list of all the professionals you may need help from after baby is born. Have your research done and get your recommendations early.
  • Have your support set up. Know who your go-to people are. Most people will offer advice if asked but who do you trust most? Who will you listen to?
  • What about practical help? Talk about who will do the everyday things – the cooking, washing, cleaning, and shopping. Who can you ask to help you in the early weeks?

Conversations to have before baby is born.

You have probably discussed everything from breastfeeding pumps to car seats to how to announce baby’s arrival, but there are other conversations that are probably best to have before baby arrives. These can be difficult conversations to have when you are tired or stressed, so having them when you both are calm will allow you make decisions with calm logical heads.

  • Visitors in the first few days – who is allowed visit and for how long? How to manage this? What will be the role of grandparents?
  • How do you deal with tiredness and sleep deprivation? How can your partner support you?
  • How will the workload be divided? This should cover everything from baby to housework to free time. You are a team and setting the ground rules early is best for everyone.
  • Night-time feedings and waking – who does what?
  • Self-care – what will you need and how to recognise when you need time for yourself?

You should go back and review these conversations regularly after baby is born as you see what is required. It’s hard to imagine exactly how tired you will be or how busy you will be before baby is born. You might find that you want to do more as you are feeling great, or that you need much more support than you expected as you had a caesarean section. Whatever the situation, you can both adjust the plan as needed. As with your Birth Plan, the key with your Postnatal Plan is flexibility, as babies are unpredictable.

If you would like to know more about the postnatal period, our online course may be helpful. While it’s primarily about Baby Reflux, it is packed with very useful information for any new parent. From the effects of delivery, gut health, allergy, why babies cry, how to sooth them and so much more. You can get the full list of what is covered here – http://thehappybabyacademy.teachable.com/p/baby-reflux-a-new-approach

The Premature Baby

Having a baby a little earlier than expected can be stressful, particularly if they need a care in an Neonatal Unit. We recently spoke to Mary Cullinane, a NNU Nurse in Cork University Maternity Hospital about what parents can expect when their baby is admitted to NNU. You can listen to that episode of our podcast later in this article.

We also see babies at our clinic who were born prematurely.

One the main issues we see in premature babies is that their nervous system is often in a state of fight or flight. The earlier a baby is born and longer they spend in NICU, the more likely this is. Premature babies can cry more often, a sign of their immature nervous system. Other signs that they are under stress are:

  • they can be very alert
  • they are often in constant motion
  • and they like to be held a lot.

Parents often bring their baby to see us for a digestive issue they may be having and again, this is not unusual as their digestive systems are a little immature and in need of support.

Premature babies are often windy and their bowels can be sluggish. One of the reasons for this is that research has shown that premature babies have has fewer good bacteria compared to bad bacteria in their bowel. Breast feeding will help promote good bacteria in the gut, as will skin to skin. A breastfeeding mum can supplement the good bacteria by taking a probiotic herself too. If a premature baby is bottle fed, it is worth giving baby a good infant probiotic for at least 6 weeks. I have seen the beneficial effects of doing this in the babies attending my clinic.

Here are our Top 9 things to bring with you to the NNU if your baby is born preterm.

  1. Notebook and pen – you will be given new information about your baby almost every day and the best way to remember it is to write it down. You may also want to make some notes about what happened that day, what time baby was fed at or questions you may have for the staff.
  2. Diary or a journal – it can help to keep a diary of each day as it can give you a sense of control. The days can melt together, and it can be difficult to remember what happened even yesterday. Keeping a record will help.
  3. A muslin cloth that has been worn by you – Having your scent near baby will help to keep them calm. Even though you cannot be with them all the time, they know their Mum. It also helps to leave them there when you know they have a little bit of you next to them.
  4. A blanket – Use a soft cotton blanket when baby is in your arms to keep them warm and cosy. Preterm babies can lose heat easily, particularly when removed from their warm incubator.
  5. Wear loose clothing – If you are doing skin to skin with baby, or if you are breastfeeding your baby, loose clothing will help.
  6. A mirror – a small mirror will help you see baby’s face when you are doing skin to skin. Never miss a moment or an expression or a little yawn.
  7. Photographs – if you have other children at home, it’s important to include them in baby’s care. While they cannot come in to see baby, a photograph of them attached to the incubator or crib will show them that they are a very important part of this new baby’s care.
  8. Cooler bag – If you are breast feeding, having a cooler bag for expressed breast milk will save time.
  9. Food and drinks – Having some nutritious snacks and drinks for yourself is very important too. You may get time to leave the NNU to get lunch, but you may not. And as a new Mum, recovering from birth and possibly breastfeeding, your nutrition is vital.

We spoke to Mary Cullinane, a NNU Nurse in Cork University Maternity Hospital about the babies she cares for every day. Mary has been working in NNU for many years and is a wonderfully caring and dedicated nurse and midwife. Listen to this episode of our podcast below.

Baby Colic

Colic is a diagnosis that very often comes with the assumption that nothing can be done to help baby. But this is incorrect. We believe that there is always something that you can do for an upset baby.

First of all, is it really colic? Babies with other digestive issues can have very similar symptoms to the typical colic symptoms. When we see a baby at the clinic presenting with colic type symptoms Frank will always rule out other digestive issues. Very often it’s not colic, it’s something else.

When there’s no other digestive condition identified we then look at why a baby may have colic symptoms. The first thing we look at is gut immaturity or imbalance.

Many of the bacteria in a newborn baby’s gut comes from Mum. The type of delivery is important. As it when they were born. Having a well populated gut is essential to good digestive health. How a baby is fed also affects gut health.

Our latest podcast episode is all about colic. We chat about what colic is and some of the other issues it can be confused with. We discuss the causes of colic symptoms and we look at the treatment options available to help ease baby’s digestive upset.

If your baby is very distressed one of our Online Courses may help.

In these courses, will give you the benefit of all our years of experience treating babies with digestive issues and many of the associated conditions. We want to find a solution for every baby we see at our clinic and over the years we have studied digestive issues in detail, looking for causes, optimum treatment options, new research, and practical solutions. We have combined all this information in our courses so that we can help as many babies (and parents!) as possible.

If you want answers, if you want a happy baby who is not continually crying and distressed, then maybe one of our courses can help.

Let us help you become the best possible advocate for your baby.

Below you will find our information sheet about The Crying Baby. It contains some of the most common reasons a baby will cry and some tips to soothe your little one when they are distressed.

Tummy Time for your Reflux Baby

We all know how important Tummy Time is for newborns. However, it can take a while for newborn babies to settle into tummy time. It’s a bit like the first day you go to the gym. Muscles are being used that had a very quiet existence up to that point. It’s tough. And tummy time can feel a little like that for a small baby.

If you have a reflux baby, you have another hurdle to jump. Reflux babies do not like lying flat and they very often do not like tummy time at all. But tummy time is as important for these babies as it is for all babies. So how do you manage it?

Here are a few tips for effective tummy time for your reflux baby.

  1. Timing is everything. Before a feed is due but before they realise they are hungry is the best time. That can be a very short window but remember you only need to do a few minutes of tummy time to start off with.
  2. You don’t have to lie baby on the floor for tummy time. Lie baby on their tummy on your chest as you recline back and make eye contact with your baby. Encourage them to look up at you by engaging with them. This too is tummy time.
  3. Another great idea is to use a gym ball. Most pregnant mums have one and now that baby is born it may be taking up space. Let’s repurpose it for a while by using it for tummy time. Place a soft blanket on your gym ball and lie baby tummy down on it. Hold baby securely all the time by their arms. Gently and slowly roll the gym ball back and forth, while engaging with baby and making eye contact. As you roll the gym ball forward baby will lift their head to keep eye contact. This is tummy time too.

So, as you can see you have a few options for tummy time. As your baby’s reflux improves (especially if you have bought our course and found the cause of your baby’s reflux), tummy time will get a little easier. And remember too that if your baby is having a bad day, don’t feel like you must do tummy time. Tomorrow is another day.


Did you know we also have online courses for new parents? As a new parent it can sometimes feel overwhelming and we believe the more information you have, the sooner you can solve any issues your baby may have.

Your Newborn Baby is a course about the common issues we see in babies at our clinic. We look at delivery, flat head, torticollis, colic, reflux, allergy and so much more.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach is specifically for parents of reflux babies. It will help you identify and treat the cause of your baby’s reflux and explain how best to treat the reflux symptoms your baby may have.

For more information about our courses click the button below.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach

Hello, we are Frank & Rose Kelleher. We have been working with babies and children for over 30 years, Frank as a Paediatric Osteopath and a Director of Nursing Services for Disability and Rose as a Nurse and Midwife and the Manager of our Paediatric Clinic. We are also parents to 4 children.

We have a busy paediatric clinic with parents travelling from all over Ireland to see Frank. We see as many babies as we possibly can every week at our clinic, but we know there are so many other babies who need our help.

You see we look at reflux in a different way. Having seen reflux babies every day for many years at our clinic, we began to see a pattern, we began to identify causes, and we quickly understood that reflux is a symptom that is caused by several very common issues. It also has many contributory causes that can aggravate symptoms. In our opinion and experience, identifying and treating the cause MUST be the first step in the process.

During our time working with babies, we have seen many changes. Back when we started there really was no information available for parents other than from their Public Health Nurse or Doctor. The terms “all babies cry” and “he will grow out of it” are throwbacks from this era and demonstrate clearly how poorly babies and their parents were treated.

Of course, you may still be told this today but thankfully you have the power in your hands, and you can seek out a solution for your baby’s distress yourself.

We will show you how to understand and solve your baby’s reflux in our step-by-step course. No big words or complicated theories we promise. Just no-nonsense professional advice and information from people who love babies.

Baby Reflux can feel like an extremely complicated condition with many causes, treatments, and solutions. We will break it down for you piece by piece so that you will see why your baby has reflux and how you can help your baby feel more comfortable and happier.

Reflux can also require many frequent adjustments. It can feel like 1 step forward, 2 steps back some days. Again, we will help you navigate these adjustments with clarity, understanding why they are necessary and how they will help. We believe information is essential for parents dealing with baby reflux. It shows you light at the end of the tunnel. It points you in the direction of that light. And it keeps you sane!

How do you know if this course is the right one for you? Well, ask yourself these questions.

Has your baby been diagnosed with reflux?

Is your baby still in discomfort and pain?

Is treatment not making any real difference to your baby?

Is he still screaming in pain?

Do you have to hold your baby all the time?

Do you feel helpless, not knowing what is wrong and how you can help?

Then yes, our course is exactly what you are looking for.

Our course, Baby Reflux – A New Approach, will give you the benefit of all our years of experience treating babies with this condition and many of the associated conditions. We want to find a solution for every baby we see at our clinic and over the years we have studied this condition in detail, looking for causes, optimum treatment options, new research, and practical solutions. We have combined all this information in this course so that we can help as many babies (and parents!) as possible.

If you want answers, if you want a happy baby who is not continually crying and distressed, then this course is for you.

Let us help you become the best possible advocate for your baby.

Paced Feeding – What it is and why it’s so important for bottle fed reflux babies.

If you have a bottle-fed baby with reflux symptoms, you may have noticed that they can drink their bottle very quickly. They may gag and splutter as they drink it. And if they do, they are without doubt taking in too much air.

And why is that a problem?

This air takes up valuable space in your baby’s tiny tummy. If you can hear the milk sloshing around in your baby’s stomach, then there’s too much air there too. When you burp baby, they will often bring up a portion of their feed with the air and this can aggravate the reflux symptoms.

The remainder of the air must also be dealt with. This air travels down through their digestive system and baby will groan, grunt and strain as they try to get it through and out the other end. This straining adds extra pressure to an already struggling digestive system.

So how can you reduce the amount of air your baby takes in while feeding.

Paced feeding is a way of bottle feeding that allow your baby to control the flow of milk better.

1. The best position for controlled feeding is to hold baby in a semi-upright position, as opposed to lying down. This helps baby to control the flow of milk better. He only needs to be slightly reclined so that the bottle isn’t pouring down into baby’s mouth.

2. Lay the bottle teat across baby’s lips (pointed up) when baby starts rooting and opening his mouth. Let baby pull the teat into his mouth and close his lips on the base of the teat.

3. Once latched on, keep the bottle just above horizontal. This allows baby to control the flow of milk better without taking in air. This also helps the bottle to last the entire length of a normal feeding, usually 10–20 minutes, rather than baby gulping a bottle down in 5 minutes.

Baby learns to recognize when he’s full because he is not filling his belly before the signals of fullness can reach his brain.

To prevent over-feeding look for cues that baby may be getting full, such as:

• Slower sucking

• Eyes wandering or getting distracted

• Not interested in feeding

• Falling asleep

• Hands are open and relaxed

When you think baby’s getting close to being full, remove the teat from his mouth by gently twisting.

Offer it again, and if he accepts, give him about 10 sucks, and repeat until he refuses. This will help him to recognise the feelings of satiety and reduce over-feeding.

Likewise, don’t make baby take the last few drops of milk in the bottle. If he falls asleep, he is finished (an exception being new-borns, who may need to be woken up in the first few days to feed)



Did you know we also have online courses for new parents? As a new parent it can sometimes feel overwhelming and we believe the more information you have, the sooner you can solve any issues your baby may have.

Your Newborn Baby is a course about the common issues we see in babies at our clinic. We look at delivery, flat head, torticollis, colic, reflux, allergy and so much more.

Baby Reflux – A New Approach is specifically for parents of reflux babies. It will help you identify and treat the cause of your baby’s reflux and explain how best to treat the reflux symptoms your baby may have.

For more information about our courses click the button below.